Poll: Beaudesert Times readers, have your say on daylight saving debate

The generation-long daylight saving debate continues to rage in Queensland and it seems the Scenic Rim is all for it.

SUNSET: The generation-long daylight saving debate continues to rage in Queensland and it seems Redlands is all for it.

SUNSET: The generation-long daylight saving debate continues to rage in Queensland and it seems Redlands is all for it.

A day before the southern states moved to Daylight Saving Time, Brisbane mayorAdrian Schrinner called for Queensland to introduce DST by the 2032 Olympics.

The petition called for the Queensland Parliament to formally recognise the impact any introduction of daylight saving time would have on the people of north, central and western Queensland.

Scenic Rim Mayor Greg Christensen said he did not feel strongly enough to share an opinion either way.

"I am ambivalent on the issue of daylight saving in Queensland," he said.

"There are advantages for some and disadvantages for others."

Beaudesert Chamber of Commerce president David Kassulke said he was in favour of daylight saving because it was better for business including tourism operators dealing with interstate visitors.

"We did have a trial of daylight saving here about 1971," he said.

"I'm all for it. I'm sure if we put it to the Chamber of Commerce at the next meeting it would pass."

Mr Kassulke, who AJ Bush at Bromelton, said adopting daylight saving was just moving with the times.

"It's like the metric system," he said.

"That's just the way the world is run now.

"Our head office is in Sydney and every year from October to March they look at their watches about 3pm and say 'that's Queensland done'."

Kooralbyn business owner Helen Prendergast agreed, but for different reasons.

"During daylight saving, you can come home, have dinner and still have time to go down the park," she said.

"You get more family time and it's so good for the kids."

Katter's Australian Party launched a parliamentary petition in the hope of putting the issue to bed for good.

KAP leader Robbie Katter said livability in the north, and particularly the north west, would be eroded by daylight saving due to the region's oppressive heat and impacts on day to day life.

"Moving sunrise to 7.15am and sunset to 8.30pm would mean the outdoors would be oppressively warm until close to bedtime," he said.

Queensland Farmers' Federation chief executive officer Dr Georgina Davis said despite the annual political and social debate, she was yet to see evidence on the benefits of DST in Queensland.