Beaudesert medical centres to provide COVID-19 jabs from March 22

COVID VACCINE: Beaudesert Medical Centre's Dr Michael Rice with practice manager Julia Moore and registered nurse Debbie McAllister. Photo: Larraine Sathicq
COVID VACCINE: Beaudesert Medical Centre's Dr Michael Rice with practice manager Julia Moore and registered nurse Debbie McAllister. Photo: Larraine Sathicq

Covid-19 vaccinations will be available in Beaudesert from the week starting March 22, Beaudesert Medical Centre announced today.

Local GP Dr Tom Mulcahey said the news signaled an exciting development in the global pandemic.

"Vaccination is a safe and effective way to reduce the chances of getting severe COVID-19 disease, being admitted to hospital, or dying," he said.

"We are looking forward to protecting our patients and our community."

Dr Mulcahey said the vaccines would be available at several locations in Beaudesert for high risk patients in what was known as Category 1b, including most people who needed to see a doctor regularly.

First in line are people over 80 followed by those over 70, all health care workers not already vaccinated, all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, adults with certain medical conditions or disabilities and high risk workers including defence, emergency services and meat processing employees.

Beaudesert Medical Centre's Dr Michael Rice said proof of medical conditions or work could be required from people seeking vaccination from anywhere other than their usual GP.

Dr Rice said the vaccine rollout was not something Australia had seen the likes of before, with a massive number of people expected to line up for the jab.

He advised that people seeking vaccination only turn up to their GP once they had all the information about the vaccine and had made up their minds to have it.

"Lots of patients will have concerns about whether the vaccination is right for them," he said.

"A decision needs to be made before vaccination day and if you have concerns, see your regular doctor.

"If you have qualifying medical conditions, ask your doctor for a referral or summary if they will be unable to vaccinate you at their practice."

Dr Mulcahey said COVID-19 vaccination clinics would run differently to regular appointments.

"You should expect to register, get vaccinated quickly and efficiently, wait 15 minutes to rule out a reaction, and head home or back to work," he said.

"Vaccination day is too late to be making up your mind and patients should not expect to get a checkup, prescription, certificate or referral at the same visit," he said.

Dr Rice said vaccines were allocated to practices in varying numbers.

"At first, vaccinations may be available from a different practice to your usual," he said.

"As vaccine supply increases, that may change."

A second vaccine is needed at least 4 weeks after the first.

For more information, an appointment with your regular doctor is a good place to start.