Tamborine Mountain residents are furious about lomandra grass planted by council

OVERGROWN: Julie Wilkinson says the picnic area is just about inaccessible because of the lomandra grass. Photo: Supplied

OVERGROWN: Julie Wilkinson says the picnic area is just about inaccessible because of the lomandra grass. Photo: Supplied

RESIDENTS on Tamborine Mountain are calling for Scenic Rim Council to remove lomandra planted by council workers after they say is has interfered with their ability to enjoy open spaces and prevented visitors from parking near a popular tourist spot.

Tamborine Mountain resident Julie Wilkinson said she had made a formal complaint to council about the issue.

"It's very unattractive, they've planted it in the laneway opposite Witches Falls, where people park their cars when they want to go walking," she said.

"Now people can't park there and it has also grown right up against the picnic table."

A council spokesperson said council had its reasons for choosing lomandra.

"The mat rush species lomandra longifolia and lomandra hystrix are endemic species to the Tamborine Mountain area," the spokesperson said.

"Council plants these species for a number of reasons, including stabilising embankments and gullies, creating habitats and green barriers, enhancing the growing environment under trees and for general revegetation.

"They are used extensively across South East Queensland as hardy, low maintenance, landscape and revegetation species."

New plantings in an areas often used for parking for visitors to the Walking tracks at the Witches Falls National Park.

New plantings in an areas often used for parking for visitors to the Walking tracks at the Witches Falls National Park.

Ms Wilkinson said she had heard back from council since she lodged her complaint and she was not satisfied with their response.

"Council says they planted there because they wanted to protect trees in the area from root compression, but that park opened in 1908 and those trees have been there all that time without any effect.

"Meanwhile there are ancient trees on the roadside where water trucks and buses often pass, council has no concerns about these and instead they are restricting access to parks and open spaces."

Ms Wilkinson said council had told her the plant was chosen because it was native to Tamborine Mountain.

"That doesn't mean you have to cover the whole mountain with the rotten stuff," she said.

"You can barely get to an open space, it's spiky and it grows to head height. It's in a flat picnic area and it's not serving any purpose.

"We want it removed. We've even talked about adopting a park, people on the mountain are used to doing things for themselves and people would be more than happy to keep the area neat and tidy."

Ms Wilkinson says this ancient Black Butt had not needed lomandra to protect it from root damage, despite heavy vehicles regularly passing by.

Ms Wilkinson says this ancient Black Butt had not needed lomandra to protect it from root damage, despite heavy vehicles regularly passing by.

Ms Wilkinson said she had been approached by many people who agreed the lomandra had to go.