Hundreds show up for Scenic Rim Drynan family reunion

HISTORY: Fourth generation family member Ray Drynan and two-month-old Allarick Schubring representing the eighth generation with parents Rebecca and Mitchell.

HISTORY: Fourth generation family member Ray Drynan and two-month-old Allarick Schubring representing the eighth generation with parents Rebecca and Mitchell.

MORE than 300 relatives turned up as the descendants of Anne Farrell and Andrew Drynan came home on April 7 to celebrate the family's rich history in the Beaudesert Shire.

The occasion marked 144 years since Andrew selected land on the Logan River which he called Telemon Crossing and made his home. Since then eight generations of Drynans have lived and worked in the region.

The last family reunion was their centenary in 1975 and with the 150-year point fast-approaching, it was decided the reunion would be held early so the final living member of the the third generation, Andrew's youngest grandson, Ray, could attend.

Ninety-one-year-old Ray spent 88 years of his life at Telemon Crossing before moving to Beaudesert's Elysium Village a little more than two years ago. His grandson, Andrew, now occupies the original homestead.

Catherine Drynan, who still lives in Innisplain, not far from the original homestead, said the reunion was a success, with relatives making their way back from all over Australia and New Zealand.

"The weekend started with a mass at Christmas Creek Catholic Church to celebrate the five sisters who married local farmers and were buried at Christmas Creek cemetery," Ms Drynan said.

"They were Mary Cahill, Kate O'Neill, Julia Smith, Margaret Waters and Harriet Flanagan. About 120 people were at the mass."

Andrew and Anne also had four sons - William, James, Andrew and John.

Ms Drynan said the reunion on Sunday was held at the Rathdowney Information Centre and Historical Museum, which presented a magnificent display of family trees and historical family photos.

The reunion included lunch, brief family history readings and music from Scotland and Ireland performed by June Farmers to honour the homelands of Andrew and Anne Drynan .

Those present also observed a minute's silence for deceased relatives before joining in one voice for the national anthem and Auld Lang Syne.

A willingness to contribute and interest in the welfare of the region have typified the Drynan family across the generations.

The family had a representative serving on local government for 100 years dating from 1884 when Andrew was first elected. Family members also did their part in various war efforts.