Beaudesert police join the campaign for Easter holiday safety

SAFETY FIRST: Senior Constable Ian Phillips will be among local police officers reminding Scenic Rim motorists to stay safe over the holidays. Photo: Larraine Sathicq

SAFETY FIRST: Senior Constable Ian Phillips will be among local police officers reminding Scenic Rim motorists to stay safe over the holidays. Photo: Larraine Sathicq

BEAUDESERT police have backed the state-wide strategy to keep roads safe over the Easter holidays.

The Queensland Police Service's Easter road safety campaign began on April 5 and will run until April 26 and Beaudesert's Sergeant Andrew Robinson said local officers would be out and about for the duration.

"This is a strategic local response to ensure all persons travelling through Beaudesert stay safe," he said.

"Safety is paramount, we take this seriously and will be focusing on major corridors with an expected increase in volume of traffic as people head out on holidays or to visit family and friends.

"We want to send the message that road safety is everyone's responsibility."

Queensland Police Commissioner Ian Stewart said that anyone travelling on the state's highways could expect to encounter police as the campaign coincided with the Easter school holidays, a period in which there would be a large increase of vehicles on the roads.

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"Personally, I don't think we'll have success on the roads until our road toll is zero. And that's based on my own experience," Inspector Park said.

"I've seen people with iPads set up on their dashboard watching a movie while they're driving. Especially if they know they're going to hit peak hour traffic or slow traffic.

"I mean, you can still kill someone regardless of the fact that your average speed might only be 10 to 20 kilometres an hour.

"It can still happen."

The Easter road safety campaign is targeting the Fatal Five - speeding, drink/drug driving, fatigue, seat belt use and driver distraction/inattention.