Beaudesert radio to start drugs conversation

NOT EVEN ONCE: Australian Anti Ice Campaign founder Andréa Simmons and care team coordinator Leeanne Butcher at 101.5 BeauFM for the first broadcast of Let’s Talk about Ice. Photo: Supplied
NOT EVEN ONCE: Australian Anti Ice Campaign founder Andréa Simmons and care team coordinator Leeanne Butcher at 101.5 BeauFM for the first broadcast of Let’s Talk about Ice. Photo: Supplied

THE Australian Anti Ice Campaign has come to Beaudesert to host a fortnightly show Let’s Talk about Ice aired on community radio 101.5 BeauFM.

AAIC care team coordinator Leeanne Butcher hosts the show with a different guest interview each fortnight.

Ms Butcher said the show would be aired from 7pm to 8pm every second Friday and was designed to engage the local community in a discussion about ice. 

“Our aim is to help educate people on the dangers of Ice, however we are also looking specifically to reach out to families or individuals who are struggling with Ice addiction,” she said.

“There is always hope and we are here to help.”

AAIC spokesperson Glenn Ivers said the aim of the group was to raise awareness and educate the public, particularly young people, about the dangers of the drug ice, or crystal methamphetamine.

“The core message is “Not Even Once” and the core objective is “Putting the Freeze on Ice”,” he said.

“AAIC have conducted in-school education workshops for high school students as well as similar workshops for workers at BHP mines, Queensland child safety workers, children in the Queensland youth justice system and in prisons.

“A person who is trapped in Ice addiction will often feel ashamed and trapped in a cycle they can’t see a way out of."

Andréa Simmons

“The education workshops are delivered by trained people with lived experience like Andréa Simmons, who have recovered from Ice addiction.

“Workshop presenters are able to integrate their own personal story of the hell of Ice addiction, into an evidence based interactive presentation for up to 60 participants at a time.”

Ms Simmons said AAIC Presenters were also trained in dual diagnosis and brief intervention, to help those entrapped in addiction and contemplating change to create a pathway plan into recovery.

“A person who is trapped in Ice addiction will often feel ashamed and trapped in a cycle they can’t see a way out of,” she said.

“These people feel much more comfortable speaking to someone who has been where they are and can identify with what they are going through.

“They can also see hope – someone who has escaped the entrapment of Ice addiction. This hope is critical for people to take the first step towards recovery.”