Local fix for risky roadway at Laravale

ROAD IRE: Laravale residents Ray Edwards and Diane Berns are fed up with roads still being in poor condition following flood damage. Photo: Jocelyn Garcia
ROAD IRE: Laravale residents Ray Edwards and Diane Berns are fed up with roads still being in poor condition following flood damage. Photo: Jocelyn Garcia

LARAVALE’S Ray Edwards and Diane Berns are so furious with what they consider to be council’s neglect of Round Mountain Road that Mr Edwards has taken it upon himself to improve the roadway.

Mr Edwards said he graded the road, fixing pot holes and clearing mud off the bridge on Josephville Road as it was impassable.

He said that after Scenic Rim Regional Council had not cleared the bridge and fixed the corrugation on Round Mountain Road following flood damage earlier this year he felt he needed to help.

“(Council) workers came a few weeks ago to fill holes but within a week it was back to the way it was,” he said.

“Signage has only just been placed on the road now.

“That’s just not good enough.”

Mr Edwards criticised council for slow responses after residents, including himself and Ms Berns, contacted the council several times about the issue.

Ms Berns said she was fed up with council and its “bandaid fix”.

She said Round Mountain Road was dangerous for drivers. “Trucks are hooning along the road and it only makes it worse, especially when the dust flies up in the air as they pass – it makes it hard to breathe, ” she said.

Ms Berns said she was too scared to drive more than 15 km/h on the road, fearing she might lose control of her car, as the vehicle furiously shook.

“It is a disgrace council has left it the way it is,” she said.

“I don’t understand how a school bus filled with kids drives on this road twice a day – it’s unsafe.”

Scenic Rim mayor Greg Christensen said council acknowledged road conditions in the region, including in the Laravale area, had deteriorated from flood and stormwater damage.

He said almost half of the council-controlled roads within the region sustained some degree of damage, with repair costs exceeding $40 million.

Cr Christensen said council completed temporary repairs to restore community connectivity on Round Mountain and Josephville roads during the emergent works period following the natural disaster.

“Signage was installed on Round Mountain Road where, due to the loss of bitumen seal, there was an unexpected change in road conditions from bitumen to gravel,” he said.

“On the existing unsealed road network, motorists are always urged to drive to the prevailing conditions, regardless of their familiarity with the route, as road surfaces can be variable, even in the best conditions.”