Scenic Rim dog breeder register shows suburb-by-suburb snapshot of puppy industry

PUPPY PICTURE: Buying puppies from Queensland breeders that follow the guidelines is now easier via a free register. Photo: Christopher Furlong

PUPPY PICTURE: Buying puppies from Queensland breeders that follow the guidelines is now easier via a free register. Photo: Christopher Furlong

THREE weeks after the state government opened a free dog breeders’ register to tackle illegal puppy farms, over one hundred Scenic Rim breeders have taken steps to make themselves known to the public.

The data, released by the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, reveals a smattering of registered dog breeders throughout the region, although the towns of Beaudesert, Canungra and Tamborine have a higher concentration of breeder registrations than others.

Smashing the business model

According to Agriculture Minister Bill Byrne, more than 2200 Queenslanders have registered on the dog breeder register across the state.

“I think this shows strong support for the legislation and that overwhelmingly dog owners in our state want to do the right thing,” he said.

“We know that the vast majority of dog lovers support the measures and this is a very encouraging start in smashing the business model for unethical and exploitative breeders.

“It shows the message is getting out that to stop cruel puppy farms, everyone from breeder to buyer needs to be doing the right thing.”

The legislation, which came into effect on May 26, requires anyone who breeds a dog to register and get a supply number within 28 days of the litter being born.

Breeders must use their supply number when advertising, selling or giving away puppies born from May 26.

The supply number must be included in the microchip information of the dog and can be used to find information about the breeder using the online register.

Mr Byrne said the register would give people buying pets the ability to find more information about the pet’s background so they know they are buying from a registered breeder.

“The new laws apply to regular and occasional breeders, including backyard litters, with specific exemptions for some genuine working dogs,” he said.

“Implementing compliance with the new laws involves a partnership between local councils, Biosecurity Queensland and the RSPCA Queensland.”

Over 100 breaches

A notorious local case of dog neglect still resonates in the region.

In 2008 Buccan dog breeder Geraldine Robertson faced a total of 149 breaches over the care of animals, in a case that was later permanently stayed on the grounds that she was not fit to stand trial. 

According to Mrs Robertson, she was innocent, arguing that none of her dogs were sick and she was not guilty of any wrongdoing.

- with Cheryl Goodenough and Brian Williams 

To register your puppies or to check on a breeder you’re considering buying from visit qdbr.daf.qld.gov.au or contact 13 25 23.

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